Caraganza First Drive Review Genesis G70 3.3T Sport: An elegant Stinger

(Genesis)

(Genesis)

Sandwiched among my favorite things in life such as yoga pants (but not on me), and babies (as long as they belong to someone else) are compact luxury sedans. Especially if they have a ‘Sport’ designation attached to them.

That’s perhaps because at my age the small sports cars are a chore to get in and out of. I sometimes feel as though I will get wedged in one and be trapped; there to live out my remaining years chewing the Nappa leather seats to survive.

On the other hand, the large sedans, sport or otherwise, can be a bit cumbersome on the road. Large four wheel land yachts that take up an entire lane and are as hard to park as getting our government to agree on something, anything actually.

No, I like the small and midsized sports badged luxury sedans; the 3-Series, C-Class, IS and such.

Genesis now has one to throw into that mix.  They sent me the new for 2019 G70 for a week recently, and I was glad they did.

The 2019 Genesis G70 is the new entry level luxury sedan from the upscale Genesis brand, which broke away on its own from parent Hyundai last year.  It’s an entry level luxury sedan slotted below the G80 and G90 in the lineup

And after spending a few days with the G70, it seems poised to give the BMWs, Mercedes and Lexus a run.

The G70 shares its platform with the Kia Stinger but has a wheelbase 2.8 inches shorter than its hatchback cousin.   The look isn’t anything like its cousin however.  Yes, it’s sleek, a bit muscular with a low stance with the red Brembo brakes showing through the sport version’s alloy rims giving a further clue of the G70s capability.  But there are hints of elegance in the lines like dark chrome accents giving the G70 an overall stylish look.

The trim levels are most noticeable under the hood.  Standard is a 2.0-liter turbo-four rated at 255 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque with a 3.3-liter twin-turbo V-6 with 365 hp and 376 lb-ft optional, with either rear wheel of all wheel drive available. The power is delivered to the road via an eight-speed automatic transmission.

(Genesis)

(Genesis)

Inside, the interior, somewhat disappointingly, seems all Hyundai,  to be fair an upscale version, but Hyundai, nonetheless.  It can be best described as adequate. Sure, it has an 8.0-inch touchscreen, a rear-view camera, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, heated front seats, and dual-zone climate control and my Sport model added a 360-degree camera system, ventilated front seats, a heated steering wheel, an adaptive suspension, Nappa leather upholstery, full LED headlights, a power-operated trunk, and a large sunroof, but there seems to be some work to be done.

Not only did my sport model have the 3.3-liter twin-turbo V-6, it was also fitted with a dynamic torque vectoring system, the upgraded brakes, a mechanical limited slip differential, adjustable driving modes that included launch control.

All models come standard with all the latest in safety features including blind spot, and forward collision avoidance.

Once you learn that this is a cousin to the Stinger the natural question is, how alike are they?

The engines are the same, the weight is nearly the same (G70: 3887, Stinger: 3829) and they share most of the same undercarriage.  In the Stinger I coaxed a 0-60 time of 4.7, in the G70 the time was 4.6, so not much difference there.  Even the prices aren’t a separator; both models I tested were less than $1000 apart in MSRP.

The bigger difference is near the back. The Stinger after all is technically a hatchback, so the rear seats have a bit more room and a hatchback always makes for a bit more storage. On the road given both have near the same weight, the G70 seems just as much fun as the Stinger, so no real changes there.

But, to me the G70 seems to just exude a bit more class.  And yes, while the outside looks great the interior needs a bit more; a bit more, of something. It’s only been just over a year since Genesis made the move to its own brand, so maybe there’s still some catching up to do.

As it stands right now, the G70 is a fine machine, and with a few minor tweaks could be the perfect car for those of us who love the Stinger but want a little more class.

The 2019 Genesis G70 Sport 3.3T
MSRP: $43,750
MSRP (as tested): $50,495
Engine: 3.3 L twin turbo V6, 365 hp @ 6000 rpm, 376 lb-ft torque @ 1300 rpm
Transmission: 8 speed shiftable automatic w/OD
Fuel Mileage (EPA): 18 city, 26 highway, 21 combined
Fuel Mileage (as tested, mixed conditions): 22 mpg
Base Curb Weight: 3,887 lbs
Interior Dimensions
Front Head Room (in):39.7
Front Leg Room (in): 42.6
Front Shoulder Room (in): 56.3
Second Head Room (in): 36.9
Second Leg Room (in): 34.8
Second Shoulder Room (in):54.6

Exterior Dimensions
Wheelbase (in): 111.6
Length, Overall (in): 184.4
Width, Max w/o mirrors (in): 72.8
Height, Overall (in): 55.1
Track Width, Front (in): 62.8
Track Width, Rear (in): 64.3
Min Ground Clearance (in): 5.5

Warranty
Basic: 5 Years/60,000 Miles
Drivetrain: 10 Years/100,000 Miles
Corrosion: 7 Years/Unlimited Miles
Roadside Assistance: 5 Years/Unlimited Miles
Maintenance: 3 Years/36,000 Miles

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Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.

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