Caraganza Review 2018 Audi Q7: Does this dress make me look fat?

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Why mess with an already good thing? If the outfit looks good in the mirror, why try on another? If the hair is perfect, don’t try and get it even more “perfect”.  We men have known this for centuries. Yet we still waste thousands upon thousands of hours during our lifetimes waiting for our significant others to get ready to be seen outside the confines of home.

Seriously, if a man needs to run to the grocery to pick up something for dinner, we can put on a pair of sweat pants and a t-shirt with a hole in the underarm and slip on a pair of flip-flops.  If a woman is tasked with the same, it will be until at least breakfast the next day before she considers herself properly dressed and primped.  It might take so long that her family will be nearly dead from hunger sporting distended bellies like children starving in a third world country.

And woe be it to the man who has to wait to go out with said woman.  You’re chances of arriving on time are minimal at best; in fact, you will have a better chance of winning a billion dollars in a lottery.  She will try on everything in her closet, primp and preen, then do it all again and then ask if “this dress makes me look fat”.  Of course, we say it doesn’t, even if she looks like the bearded fat woman from a circus sideshow.

The truth is women look great to those that love them no matter what.  Yet, we still wait.

Based on this, Audi then must be a man.

In 2017 they completely redid the Q7, and for 2018 made only small changes.  And that’s a very good thing.

Not that the Q7 ever looked like sweatpants, torn t-shirts and flip-flops. Far from it.

I had a week with one last year and Audi sent me a 2018 for a recent week. Specifically, the 2018 2.0t quattro Tiptronic.  Now for the uninitiated, quattro refers to four-wheel drive, and Tiptronic is an automatic transmission that thinks it’s a manual with an option to switch out of automatic mode and upshift or downshift by using paddles behind the steering wheel or by using the gear lever itself.
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The 2018 I had for the week had only those minor changes; the proximity-sensing Advance Key is now standard on all Q7 models with passive entry, memory features, and push-button start, and the 3D Bose Surround Sound stereo is now standard on the Premium Plus trims and top-trim Prestige models get soft-close doors.

It’s still offered in three trims: Premium, which is loaded enough to make most happy, but it can’t have many options added; the Premium Plus which has a few more standard features and can get more options an customization, and the top of the line Prestige which is, very Prestigious, and the most luxurious of the lineup  with some exclusive options.

There two engines under the hood: the base engine is a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder with 252 horsepower and 273 pound-feet of torque and a supercharged 3.0-liter six-cylinder produces 333 horsepower and 325 lb-ft and can be optioned in on all three trims.

The standard nanny features are Audi’s Pre-Sense Basic with Pedestrian Detection, which takes steps to mitigate injury and damage in a collision.  Options include front and rear parking sensors and a rearview camera along with a power-folding third-row bench, split-folding second row, auto-dimming rearview mirror, power rear liftgate, HomeLink garage door opener, heated power-folding side mirrors, and LED running lights and taillights.

Of course, being an Audi, all the tech stuff is present.  Standard tech includes Bluetooth, rearview camera, 7-inch color driver information display in the gauge cluster, and Audi’s MMI user interface with a 7-inch central display, two USB ports and a 10-speaker sound system. You can also add navigation that can search for locations with Google Voice Search, smartphone integration, and a a few other connected features.

The interior has the utilitarian sort of luxury that only Audi seems to be able to pull off brilliantly.  Where the Q7 shines though is on the road. It’s hard to remember that this is a large 7 passenger SUV.  It drives more like a sedan than an SUV.

Last year I had the Prestige with the supercharged 3.0-liter six-cylinder, this go-around it was the base turbocharged 2.0. Yes, there was a bit of a difference, but honestly for everyday use the 2.0 has all the power a driver should ever need.  Owing to its sedan sort of drive there is little doubt the suspension can meet just about anything you throw at it.  All the while swaddling 7 adults in a quiet, comfortable luxurious and spacious cabin.

I’m glad Audi made only a few minor changes for 2018. It already looked fine to go out of the house and we didn’t have to wait to be fed.

The 2018 Audi Q7
MSRP: $49,900
MSRP: $62,100
Engine: 2.0-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder, 252 hp @5000 rpm, 273 lb-ft torque @1600 rpm
Transmission: 8-speed automatic shiftable Tiptronic
All-Wheel drive
Fuel Mileage (EPA): 19 city, 25 highway, 21 combined
Fuel Mileage (as tested, mixed conditions): 22mpg
Base Curb Weight: lbs     4696

Interior Dimensions
Passenger Capacity:     7
Front Head Room: in     38.4
Front Leg Room: in     41.7
Front Shoulder Room: in     59.5
Second Head Room: in     38.8
Second Leg Room: in     38.8
Second Shoulder Room: in     58.5
Third Head Room: in     35.9
Third Leg Room: in     29.2
Third Shoulder Room: in     49.4

Exterior Dimensions
Wheelbase: in     117.9
Length, Overall: in     199.6
Width, Max w/o mirrors: in     77.5
Height, Overall: in     68.5
Track Width, Front: in     66.1
Track Width, Rear: in     66.6

Warranty
Basic: 4 Years/50,000 Miles
Drivetrain: 4 Years/50,000 Miles
Corrosion: 12 Years/Unlimited Miles
Roadside Assistance: 4 Years/Unlimited Miles
Maintenance: 1 Years/10,000 Miles

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Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.

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